Should Boys’ Grades Suffer Due to Their Behavior in School?

My son is in kindergarten. He’s smart but sometimes he has a problem staying in his seat …and standing in line …and not talking. He’s not the only one. My husband and I worked with him at home, and he’s improved. So have his ‘report card grades.’ Even though, I feel his school work performance remains the same. And I’m concerned. 

This article gives documentation to my concern. It’s extremely relative and important to read, share, and discuss. Is your son’s physical behavior at school negatively impacting his academic grade? boys in the back

The Boys at the Back by Christina Hoff Summers – NYTimes.com

Boys score as well as or better than girls on most standardized tests, yet they are far less likely to get good grades, take advanced classes or attend college. Why? A study coming out this week in The Journal of Human Resources gives an important answer….  No previous study, to my knowledge, has demonstrated that the well-known gender gap in school grades begins so early and is almost entirely attributable to differences in behavior. The researchers found that teachers rated boys as less proficient even when the boys did just as well as the girls on tests of reading, math and science. (The teachers did not know the test scores in advance.) If the teachers had not accounted for classroom behavior, the boys’ grades, like the girls’, would have matched their test scores.

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5 Tips for Communicating with Preschool Teachers

My munchkins are getting into some mischief at school (talking, not paying attention, etc.).  Here’s what I picked up in communicating – and not communicating – with the preschool teachers.  

*  Teachers don’t want to be thought of as not being able to handle their classroom or their students. Even if your child is acting in a matter that you don’t feel is appropriate, the teacher may not tell you or tell you the extent to which your child is misbehaving in fear of appearing that she doesn’t have control of her class.  However, this becomes an issue later when/if the behavior escalates.

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9-Year-Old Boy Sells Lemonade To Get Detroit Out of Debt

This is by far one of the most inspirational, yet saddest stories I’ve come across this week.
– I’m so impressed with this child and his ambition! He saw a problem and he’s trying to be a part of the solution!
– It’s sad that a child is so deflated and scared about how his city has gone down.
– I’m not happy with the mayor’s response! It’s nice that he encouraged him to save for college. But, he could have at least invited the child to his office and made plans to CLEAN THE PARKS!!!

I also applaud the child’s parents for their support. Why don’t stories like these go viral? Please check it out (below) and click here for the whole story. What do you think?

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Open Education = No More Textbooks?

Not quite. But I like the way it sounds so far. It’s free, global, and stockpiles vast amounts of educational resources for all levels. Although I’ve only heard about it being integrated on the university level so far, there are websites that store teaching content for kids in Kindergarten ( one listed below)! Check out one of the winners of the Why Open Education Matters video competition to get more of an idea of this concept: 

For more information, visit the links below:
What are Open Education Resources?
Why Open Education Matters Video Competition Winners Announced
Open Educational Resources Commons

Gaps in Educating and Learning for Adolescent Boys

Do you believe boys learn differently than girls? This recent article seems right on point with the problems boys are experiencing – but what about the suggested solutions?

In cutting to the chase, Lon Woodbury asked today’s guest on his Internet Talk Radio Show: “Parent Choices for Struggling Teens” on LATalkRadio, “What is the status of boys today?” In response, Kelley King, Associate Director of Gurian Institute, shared an amazing list of considerable gaps that today’s boys are facing in education and learning. These gaps include: significant reading gaps, higher discipline reports, substance abuse, more D’s and F’s for boy’s, more drop-outs and a significant drop in enrollment in college (with girls at 60% and boys at 40%).
via Educating the Adolescent Male Brain.

Mom Gives Clues on How/ Why Son Got into College at 15

I know all of us don’t homeschool – or maybe wouldn’t want their child to be in college so young – but this is a good (albeit brief) insight on how education starts at home and our role as parents in administering it.

I didn’t like that the reporter immediately (seemingly) focused on a possible negative for the child being in college so young. Do you know that 50 years ago, it wasn’t uncommon for teenagers his age to start college (Martin Luther King, my dad…) What do you think?

The Write Challenge

I just discovered and signed up for the NaBloPoMo (National Blog Posting Month).  It’s perfect timing for me since I’m really digging this whole blogging thing right now – and I like to write – so I’m pretty pumped!

I’ve been a writer since elementary school. Since the skill has always come naturally for me, I just figured my kids would be likely enthusiasts too – right?  The process of teaching the beginning mechanics never crossed my mind – until now.  My 4 y.o. hit preschool with the challenge of writing his name and, well, it’s a little more involved than I imagined …

iPads, iPods Helping Boys in UK Improve Literacy Skills

Teachers at a south Wales school say investing in smartphones and MP3 players has helped pupils improve their literacy skills

Ysgol Glannau Gwaun in Fishguard, Pembrokeshire

Pupils’ literacy skills have improved because of working with iPads, say teachers at Ysgol Glannau Gwaun in Fishguard.
 
The school invested in 16 iPads and 20 iPods specifically to improve literacy skills among its 247 pupils, thinking the boys especially might react positively to the technology. Irwyn Wilcox, the headteacher, said: “We were looking to beef up technology and find ways of engaging the pupils in different ways. I’m convinced it’s having an impact.” Continue reading